Science/Nature

Plastic pollution: Bangor divers cleaning up the seabed

[ad_1] You might have heard of people doing a traditional beach clean up, but what about all the rubbish underwater?A group of divers from voluntary organisation Seasearch have started carrying special bags to allow them to collect littler from the seabed.Seasearch is primarily concerned with making a record of the wildlife and other characteristics of the water in which they dive.We went along to a special underwater clean up at
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Largest world stock of animal-killing virus destroyed by UK lab

[ad_1] Image copyright Pirbright Institute Image caption The rinderpest virus, shown here infecting a cell, is highly contagious in cattle Scientists have destroyed the UK's laboratory stocks of a virus that once caused devastating cattle losses.These stocks accounted for most of the world's lab samples of rinderpest, which were held at The Pirbright Institute in Surrey.Rinderpest and the deadly smallpox virus are the only diseases to have been eradicated from
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Pope warns oil bosses of climate threat

[ad_1] Image copyright Reuters The Pope has told oil company bosses that climate change threatens the future of the "human family". The oil executives had been invited to the Vatican in Rome for an audience with the pontiff.Pope Francis said a radical energy transition is needed to save what he called "our common home".The head of BP agreed that the world must find urgent solutions to environmental problems - but
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Harry Potter star Bonnie Wright joins kids’ plastic toy push

[ad_1] Last year 370 million toys were sold in the UK alone.And while unwanted toys do get passed on to younger children, their component parts, often containing plastic, make them difficult to recycle.So how do we get children to think about the amount of plastic in toys, without spoiling their fun?Actor and Greenpeace campaigner Bonnie Wright, who played Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter films, has been investigating in a
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Greenpeace rig protest brought to an end

[ad_1] Image caption A helicopter arriving at the rig The occupation of an oil rig by Greenpeace protesters has been brought to an end.The environmental campaigners had first boarded the Transocean rig in the Cromarty Firth on Sunday evening.The rig, under contract to BP, had been due to leave from near Invergordon, heading for the Vorlich oil field east of Aberdeen.Police said nine people in total had been arrested in
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Scotland’s crannogs are older than Stonehenge

[ad_1] Image copyright Chris Murray Image caption Neolithic pottery was previously found near crannogs in the Western Isles Archaeologists have discovered that some Scottish crannogs are thousands of years older than previously thought.Crannogs were fortified settlements constructed on artificial islands in lochs.It was thought they were first built in the Iron Age, a period that began around 800 BC.But four Western Isles sites have been radiocarbon dated to about 3640-3360
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Chinese tombs yield earliest evidence of cannabis use

[ad_1] Image copyright Xinhua Wu Image caption Researchers found the cannabis residues within wooden braziers Researchers have uncovered the earliest known evidence of cannabis use, from tombs in western China.The study suggests cannabis was being smoked at least 2,500 years ago, and that it may have been associated with ritual or religious activities.Traces of the drug were identified in wooden burners from the burials.The cannabis had high levels of the
Science/Nature

Bermuda land snail: An animal ‘back from the dead’

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionThe greater Bermuda land snail is back from the brink Thousands of critically endangered snails have been released into the wild after being rescued from the edge of extinction, with a little help from a British zoo.The greater Bermuda land snail was thought to have disappeared for many years until an empty shell turned up in the territory's capital city, Hamilton.Live